Ivey Business Plan competition shows that investors like female businesses

Rick Spence captured the comments given at the Women Entrepreneurs of Canada conference (WEC, is run by Carrisa Reiniger) and one thought was that male investors do not get women's businesses and do not invest. I have personal experience that shows me that assumption is so 90's, but no long relevant in 2010. In fact, Loewen & Partners raised capital for the female led day care firm, Kids & Co, and it does not get more estrogen laden than that. I did notice at the time that the male investors did not even twitch an eyebrow at gender or business focus. After all, as one of the male fund managers said to me on my question about the relevance of gender, "Lululemon is one of the biggest Canadian private equity success stories out there and it is a female product company."
I wrote a letter to the National Post to comment because, honestly, it bothers me when entrepreneurs hid behind some "victim" stereotype instead of facing their brutal facts that they are not clicking with investors because their business is simply not sustainable. If these female entrepreneurs faced the brutal truth, they would be able to adapt all the sooner and go on to get the money they deserve.
For full article: http://bit.ly/whogetsvcmoneymore

Reluctant Partners, Feb. 1.
At the start-up stage, if you look at the Ivey Business Plan competition, for the past two out of three years, a female lead team won. This competition is judged by Bay Street's toughest investors. A female team that did not make it to the finals, Peer-FX, went on Dragons Den and won a deal. That female leader is still in business because she is good at what she does. I wrote an article at the time and asked her about being female in business. I was not surprised when she said it is just not part of her thinking.
Whether you have a uterus or testicles, investors want to know how much money you will make, when will they get their money back and will it be more than if they put it in a blue chip stock in the stock market? If you can show you can give that potential, you will attract investors. End of story.
Barbara Orser, professor at Carlton, has done research to back up these points and says only entrepreneurs who start robust, high potential businesses will get the money.
I do agree that it would be good for women to network and support each other more.
Jacoline Loewen, Loewen & Partners Inc., Toronto


Read more: http://www.nationalpost.com/opinion/story.html?id=2538961#email#ixzz0f9NoetUr 
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1 comment:

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